The Western Alliance is proud to announce CPIA designation courses will be available via webinar format beginning in January 2024 at piawest.com.  

 

Check our calendar of events for course informatioin.  

Registrations will be open soon!

CPIA - Certified Professional Insurance Agent

Empowering Insurance Professionals into the Future

The CPIA designation is first-of-its-kind, hands-on, how-to training. To earn the CPIA designation candidates are required to participate in a series of three, one-day seminars THE BEST PART IS NO EXAMS!
Completion is due three years from the first course.

These seminars are designed to enhance the ability of producers, sales support staff, and company personnel to efficiently create and distribute effective insurance programs. Participants leave with ideas that will produce sales results immediately.

While not a requirement, it is recommended that courses are taken in order.E&O Discounts apply for Utica National Policy Holders.

Each of the 3 courses are approved for 7 CE in
AZ | CA | ID | MT | NM | NV | OR | WA

Course Modules

CPIA 1
Position for Success

CPIA 2
Implement for Success

CPIA 3
Sustain Success

During this workshop, participants focus on internal and external factors affecting
the creation of effective business development goals.

Factors discussed include:

current state of the insurance                 marketplace

competitive pressures

insurance carrier underwriting criteria

consumer expectations.

During this workshop, participants learn:

specific tools for analyzing consumer needs

how to utilize risk identification techniques to gather pertinent prospect
information

skills necessary to assimilate information gathered into customized coverage recommendations

how to prepare a complete submission

tips for preparing and presenting a comprehensive insurance proposal

This workshop focuses on fulfilling the implied promises contained in the insuring agreement.

Participants will:

review methods of providing evidence of insurance coverage

discuss policies and procedures for controlling errors and omissions including policy review and delivery, endorsements, claims-processing, and handling of client complaints

learn how to calculate the lifetime value of a client and techniques for generating referrals.

CPIA Update Requirement

The Certified Professional Insurance Agent designation stands for professionalism, commitment to professional training and results, and technical knowledge. To maintain the right
to use the CPIA designation, designees must complete an update on an annual basis * or maintain a Ruby, Sapphire or Diamond level membership with the CPIA Program.

* CPIA 1, CPIA 2, CPIA 3, Special Topics:

An Agent’s Guide to Understanding and Mitigating Cyber Exposures

Disaster and Continuity Planning for Business and Families

An E&O Loss Control Program for Agencies

Montana — Property Tax Reform: Montana Governor Greg Gianforte wants to reform property taxes and has named a bipartisan group and charged them with coming up with recommendations for next year’s Legislature.

The goal is to reduce the property tax burden for all Montanans.

The task force will be chaired by Montana Budget Director Ryan Osmundson. Many on the task force also serve in the Legislature. Some are tax experts, others are local government leaders and are involved in schools. The rural farming community is also represented.

“We must protect Montana homeowners from rising property taxes, and I look forward to the work of the Property Tax Task Force to reform our property tax system and arrest the rate of growth of property taxes,” Gianforte said in the news release announcing the formation of the task force.

The governor hopes to address the problem of rising property tax rates which averaged about 21% in 2023.

The governor wants the task force to address these issues:

  • How to slow the rate of property tax growth, including assessments and fees.
  • How to make property tax bills more transparent and easier to understand, and how to improve customer service regarding payment schedules.
  • How to increase transparency and engagement in public budgeting processes.
  • How to increase public participation in mill levy ballot measures.
  • How to ensure that the tax burdens on homeowners and long-term renters “reflect well on supporting homeownership and workforce housing.”
  • How to ensure access to quality education. (Property taxes provide a significant share of funding for Montana schools.)
  • How to ensure that lower-income Montana homeowners, including those who are on fixed incomes or who are disabled veterans, aren’t put at risk of losing their homes as a result of property taxes.

These are the members of the task force:

  • Ryan Osmundson, task force chair and Office of Budget and Program Planning director
  • Sen. Greg Hertz, R-Polson, Senate Taxation Committee chair
  • Sen. Tom McGillvray, R-Billings, Senate Finance & Claims Committee member
  • Sen. Shane Morigeau, D-Missoula, Senate Finance & Claims Committee member
  • Rep. David Bedey, R-Hamilton, House Appropriations Committee member
  • Rep. Dave Fern, D-Whitefish, House Taxation Committee member
  • Rep. Llew Jones, R-Conrad, House Appropriations Committee chair
  • Brendan Beatty, Montana Department of Revenue director
  • Manish Bhatt, senior policy analyst with the Center for State Tax Policy at the Tax Foundation
  • Kendall Cotton, president and CEO of the Frontier Institute
  • Errol Galt, Meagher County commissioner
  • Pam Holmquist, Flathead County commissioner
  • Jeremy Horpedahl, Ph.D., associate professor of economics and director of Arkansas Center for Research in Economics at the University of Central Arkansas
  • Dwaine Iverson, board member of the Montana Taxpayers Association and CPA
  • Cyndi Johnson, president of the Montana Farm Bureau Federation
  • Sean Logan, Helena city commissioner
  • Lance Melton, executive director of the Montana School Boards Association
  • Gordon Oelkers, Roosevelt County commissioner
  • Todd O’Hair, president and CEO of the Montana Chamber of Commerce
  • Justin Ross, Ph.D., professor of economics and public finance, Paul H. O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University
  • Derek “DJ” Smith, president of the Montana Association of Realtors
  • Sandra Vasecka, Missoula City Council member
  • Ronda Wiggers, Montana State Director of the National Federation of Independent Business

Source link: Montana Free Press — https://bit.ly/41ZA642

Montana — Health Provider Payments: According to a story in The Montana Free Press, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services is several months behind in paying the organizations it contracts with to provide services.

The story says this is over 200 providers who are both private and public. Jim Hainy is the executive director of the Montana Peer Network. He says he’s never seen anything like this.

“I’ve never seen it this dysfunctional,” he noted. “Something just completely broke down, but there is nothing coming out. Not even a letter to say, ‘Hey, sorry, we’re not going to get the contracts out.’”

Montana’s department of health contracts with over 4,000 organizations. The delays have caused serious financial issues and employee layoffs.

Source link: Montana Free Press — https://bit.ly/3S12cY3

Oregon — Information from PIA Oregon Lobbyist Lana Butterfield: The Oregon Legislature passed hundreds of bills in the last session, revising some existing transportation laws and creating new ones. Many changes went into effect on Jan. 1, 2024. 

“We are encouraged that our legislators passed bills that prioritize safety for people who use our transportation system,” said Kris Strickler, director of the Oregon Department of Transportation. “The updates in speed enforcement and impaired driving laws, especially, allow our partners in law enforcement to better deter behaviors that have proven to be dangerous.” 

HB 2095 – Gives all cities in Oregon the authority to use mobile photo radar for traffic enforcement – as long as they pay their own operational costs – and removes limits on the number of hours it can be used. The bill also allows cities to lower the speed limit on certain streets at up to 10 miles below the statutory speed (but not less than 20 mph).

HB 2316 – The bill changes definitions and potential penalties for driving under the influence of intoxicants. An “intoxicant” now includes any substance, or combination of substances, that can cause mental and physical impairment. Previously, the definition included only alcohol, cannabis, psilocybin, and controlled substances. Some fines are reduced for people convicted of DUII while riding a bicycle. 


HB 2099 — The bill makes a variety of changes to transportation laws but notably updates ODOT’s Safe Routes to School program. The bill increases the eligibility radius for Safe Routes to School projects from one mile to two miles, ensures projects serving high schools are equally considered with elementary and middle schools, and allows greater flexibility in determining the grant match requirement for individual projects.

SB 895 – Allows drivers to pass in a no passing zone if the driver encounters an obstruction, including a bicycle or other vehicle traveling at a speed of less than half the posted speed limit. The driver must ensure there are no oncoming vehicles and stay at least 5 mph under the posted speed limit while passing.

HB 2100 – Fees for some DMV services have increased to help recover costs and temporarily avoid service reductions. DMV previously announced the changes, which include fee increases for driver’s license or ID cards, vehicle registration, driver’s tests and other services. 

In addition to the new laws, a 2-cent increase in the state fuel tax went into effect on Jan. 1. This is the fourth and final fuel tax increase resulting from HB 2017 (Keep Oregon Moving). The state fuel tax now stands at $0.40 per gallon. Oregon’s fuel taxes are used for the creation, preservation, and maintenance of Oregon’s transportation infrastructure. Learn more about ODOT’s revenue and budget.

Oregon — The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently announced the following temporary rulemaking:

ID 54-2023: Adoption of Temporary Rules for disclosure and care obligations for recommendations or sales of annuities to prospective purchasers

Rules: 836-051-0905, 836-080-0170, 836-080-0172, 836-080-0175, 836-080-0178, 836-080-0180, 836-080-0183, 836-080-0185, 836-080-0188, 836-080-0190, 836-080-0193

​Summary: 2023 Senate Bill 536 (SB 536) was adopted during the 2023 Legislative Session and establishes disclosure and care obligations for sales of annuities to prospective purchasers. SB 536 closely aligns with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) updated Model Law #275 – Suitability in Annuity Transactions Model Regulation. SB 536 supersedes existing rule language pertaining to annuity product suitability. Additionally, rulemaking is required to effectuate certain components of the bill, including adopting forms that are the same or similar to NAIC Model Law #275:

Insurance Agent (Producer) Disclosure for Annuities,

Consumer Refusal to Provide Information, and

Consumer Decision to Purchase an Annuity Not Based on a Recommendation.

Filed: December 20, 2023

Effective: January 1, 2024 through June 28, 2024

Oregon — The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently announced the following permanent rulemaking: ID 55-2023: Amending OAR 836-150-0040 to add ORP payment parameters for plan year 2024

Amend Rule: 836-150-0040

​Rule Summary: The current rule defines payment parameters for ORP for claims incurred during plan years 2018-2023. The amended rule will include payment parameters for plan year 2024 (attachment point of $95,000; reinsurance cap of $1,000,000; and coinsurance rate of 50%), while deleting the provisions related to plan years 2018 and 2019.

Filed: December 21, 2023

Effective: January 1, 2024

Oregon — Recently Adopted Rulemaking: Alternative Documentation of Loss HB 2982 (2023): The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently announced the following permanent rulemaking:

ID 56-2023: Alternative Documentation of Loss Under HB 2982 (2023)

Adopt Rule: 836-080-0245

​Rule Summary: Compliance with ORS 742.053 and reference to the DFR website for a model form used to attest the total loss of contents of a residence after a major disaster.

Filed: December 28, 2023

Effective: January 1, 2024

HB 2982 Attestation.pdf

For more information on this recently adopted rule, please visit the division’s website:

https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id56-2023_rule-order.pdf

Legislative Committee Bill

LC 81 – LC0081 (oregonlegislature.gov)

Directs the State Fire Marshal to collaboratively establish a neighborhood protection cooperative grant program to promote community wildfire resilience. Requires the State Fire Marshal to award grants to local governments, fire district related organizations, and nongovernmental organizations for the purpose of providing grants to property owners for wildfire resilience efforts. Requires the State Fire Marshal to develop criteria for grant awards in consultation with specified partners, and to publish the criteria on the department website by July 1, 2024. Specifies possible criteria requirements for consideration by the State Fire Marshal. Requires the State Fire Marshal to provide a status update on the grant program establishment and administration as part of an existing biannual report to the legislature. Directs the Department of Consumer and Business Services, the Department of the State Fire Marshal, and the State Forestry Department, in consultation with insurance industry representatives, to develop a plan and implementation timeline for establishing a risk reduction certification program, and to submit a preliminary report to natural resources related legislative committees by December 1, 2024. Requires that the risk reduction certification program identifies wildfire risk mitigation actions that merit consideration in determining underwriting and insurance premium rates in such a way that is favorable to property owning insurance policy holders. Establishes the Neighborhood Protection Cooperative Grant Program Fund and appropriates $5 million to the fund for grant awards. Declares emergency, effective on passage. (Dated 12/19/23)

Oregon — The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently announced the following permanent rulemaking: ID 53-2023: Primary Care Provider Assignment (SB 1529)

Adopt Rule: 836-053-0028

​Rule Summary: Insurers must assign enrollees who are residents of the state of Oregon to an individual or group of individuals who are “primary care providers” in a specified hierarchal order.

Filed: December 19, 2023

Effective: January 1, 2024

 For more information on this recently adopted rule, please visit the division’s website:

https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id53-2023_rule-order.pdf

You can view or update your subscriptions, password or email address at any time on your User Profile Page. All you will need are your email address and your password (if you selected one).

This service is provided to you at no charge by Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. Visit us on the web at http://www.oregon.gov/DCBS/.

P.S. If you have any questions or problems visit subscriberhelp.govdelivery.com for assistance.

Oregon — The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently announced the following permanent rulemaking: ID 52-2023: Adoption of rule to allow for copayment on primary care visits

Adopt Rule: 836-053-0027

​Rule Summary: Allow for copayment on primary care visits.

Filed: December 19, 2023

Effective: January 1, 2024

For more information on this recently adopted rule, please visit the division’s website:

https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id52-2023_rule-order.pdf

You can view or update your subscriptions, password or email address at any time on your User Profile Page. All you will need are your email address and your password (if you selected one).

This service is provided to you at no charge by Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. Visit us on the web at http://www.oregon.gov/DCBS/.

P.S. If you have any questions or problems visit subscriberhelp.govdelivery.com for assistance.

Oregon — The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently announced the following permanent rulemaking: ID 51-2023: List of Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices under Oregon SB 797 (2023)

Amend Rule: 836-052-1000

​Rule Summary: Establishes list of prosthetic and orthotic devices; prohibits internal or separate limits or caps on prosthetic and orthotic devices, other than the lifetime policy maximum, when permitted by law; defines when coverage for prosthetic and orthotic device is provided through a managed care organization.

Filed: December 18, 2023

Effective: January 1, 2024

For more information on this recently adopted rule, please visit the division’s website:

https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id51-2023_rule-order.pdf

You can view or update your subscriptions, password or email address at any time on your User Profile Page. All you will need are your email address and your password (if you selected one).

This service is provided to you at no charge by Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. Visit us on the web at http://www.oregon.gov/DCBS/.

P.S. If you have any questions or problems visit subscriberhelp.govdelivery.com for assistance.

Stuck in Traffic? Six PIA Western Alliance Cities Among the Nation’s Worst

The headline is about traffic. But let’s talk household vehicles first. According to Forbes Advisor 91.7% of all households in the United States have at least one vehicle. That’s a 3.66% increase from 2018 to 2021. And these days trucks are the most popular vehicle to have in the U.S. Rural areas have more vehicles …

Stuck in Traffic? Six PIA Western Alliance Cities Among the Nation’s Worst Read More »

Small Business Start-ups — Washington & California Most Expensive

Agents? Company people, know someone thinking of starting one? If they live in the PIA Western Alliance states of Washington or California, getting things off the ground is going to be tough. The business consulting company, Venture Smarter did some research and found Washington is the second most difficult state in which to start and …

Small Business Start-ups — Washington & California Most Expensive Read More »

Washington Legislative Update – January 16, 2024

Fast-paced 60-day legislative session kicks off with record number of bills introduced, priorities staged for advancement, and six citizen initiatives in the backgroundThis year’s legislative session began on Monday with opening ceremonies, an iteration of caucus priorities, and on the House side, passage of a handful of unrelated bills from last session over to the …

Washington Legislative Update – January 16, 2024 Read More »