Home | Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Register
Weekly Industry News
Blog Home All Blogs
PIA Western Alliance knows you want to be the best in the field, and the best way to stay on top is to stay informed. PIA Weekly Industry News Brief is an informative e-news brief that delivers the most relevant industry content.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Insurance Content  Weekly Industry News  Insurance Industry  Insurance News  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  ObamaCare  The Affordable Care Act  Healthcare  HealthCare.gov  cyber security  Cyber Breach  PIA Western Alliance  Cyber Insurance  employment  Jobs  flood insurance  wildfires  AIG  Work  Millennials  Flood  Employees  PIA  business  Millennials & Insurance  PIA National  Taxes  insurance  MetLife  E&O 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By staff reporter, Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Around the PIA Western Alliance 

Arizona


Uber Crash Lawsuit: Last year Elaine Herzberg was hit and killed by an autonomous vehicle owned by Uber. The suit isn’t against Uber, but against the city of Tempe.

Herzberg’s husband and daughter each want $5 million in damages and say the city of Tempe created a dangerous situation when it installed a brick pathway across the median where people aren’t supposed to be crossing.

 

Source link: Insurance Journal

 

Idaho

From the Idaho Department of Insurance

A tip from a social media post helped lead to an insurance fraud conviction for a Bingham County resident.  Danielle Collins was sentenced in Bingham County District Court last week after pleading guilty to one count of insurance fraud following an investigation conducted by the Idaho Department of Insurance.

In court proceedings, Collins admitted to purchasing car insurance after damaging her vehicle.  She was placed on three years of supervised probation by Judge Darren B. Simpson and ordered to pay $800 in fines, $245 in court costs, $500 to the Public Defender’s office, and $536 in restitution to the DOI.  She also must complete 100 hours of community service.

Court records show Collins purchased an auto policy through Progressive Insurance on August 25, 2017.  Three days later she submitted a claim for an accident in which her vehicle sustained damage to its front end and both driver’s side tires.  However, Progressive officials discovered a Facebook post dated days prior to the reported date of the accident and claim submission in which Collins asked her friends and followers, “Who gets not one but two flat tires?? Meeee!!  The social media gaffe helped DOI investigators close the case against Collins.

“This is an example of how insurance fraud comes in all shapes and sizes,” said Director Dean Cameron.  “I’m proud of the work of our investigators because every case of fraud, no matter how big or small, adds up and becomes costly for all Idaho consumers.”

 

Medicare Workshop to be Offered in Idaho Falls

A free Medicare Workshop for individuals turning 65 and those approaching Medicare eligibility will be held Thursday, February 14, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Idaho Falls Senior Center, 535 W. 21st St., Idaho Falls.  Caregivers and all those interested in learning how Medicare works are encouraged to attend.

The workshop will be led by Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), a unit of the Idaho Department of Insurance.  SHIBA presenters will introduce the various parts of Medicare and explain some of the vocabulary associated with the program. 

Topics to be covered include:

 

  Timeframes for enrolling in Medicare

  Enrollment periods for Medigap, Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plans

  How the different parts of Medicare work together – and when they don’t

 

To register for the workshop, please contact the SHIBA Helpline at 1-800-247-4422.

 

Montana

Minimum Wage

Montana Democrat Rep. Mary Ann Dunwell of Helena wants the state’s minimum wage to go up from $8.50 an hour to $15. If her bill — HB 345 — gets passed, the wage will go to $12 an hour on July 1st of this year, and rise to $15 on July 1st in 2020.

The AFL-CIO and the Montana Federation of Public Employees and the Montana Department of Labor and Industry are supporting the bill.

Opposing the bill is the Montana Retail Association and the Montana Restaurant Association.

Source link: Independent Record

 

Oregon

Marijuana Audit

An audit done by the secretary of state’s office has found the inspections conducted in Oregon’s marijuana industry and not up to speed. The state says the testing system is weak and threatens consumers with contaminants.

Just 3% of the retailers have been inspected and just one-third of the state’s marijuana growers. Also — the report said — marijuana regulators are not doing much to address the black market sales.

However, so far, the legal pot market has generated $207 million in taxes for the state coffers.

 

Oregon’s Innovation Hub

The Department of Consumer and Business Services’ Division of Financial Regulation has opened its Innovation Hub to help insurance, financial, and technology companies bring innovative products, services, and tools to Oregonians.

Experts, thought leaders, and businesses are encouraged to visit dfr.oregon.gov/innovation to connect with the division’s Innovation Liaison and learn more about Oregon’s Innovation Hub.

“We want to engage and collaborate with businesses that are poised to leverage technology in a way that will benefit Oregonians.” said Andrew Stolfi, division administrator. “The Innovation Hub is here to help the businesses we regulate deliver emerging products, and services to Oregon consumers.”

The Innovation Liaison helps companies navigate regulatory guidelines in a way that enables new technology flourish within the state. The liaison helps the division develop and maintain a structure that that can adapt to innovation both now and in the future.

For more information or to connect with the Innovation Liaison visit dfr.oregon.gov/innovation

 

 

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  insurance content  insurance industry  pia western alliance 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By Staff reporter, Tuesday, February 5, 2019

 

California

Lara Testifies in Congress

 [As] the U.S. House of Representative Committee on Ways and Means [held] hearings, Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara provides testimony to protect Americans with pre-existing conditions:

“Passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was one of the most significant legislative acts in the last fifty years. The ACA has directly improved the health and economic security of millions of Californians—both those who were uninsured prior to the passage of the ACA and those whose individual or group health insurance coverage was improved. 

California decided to go "all in" with regard to implementing the Affordable Care Act. Since its passage in 2010, we have seen a dramatic decrease in the number of Californians who lack health insurance coverage. The uninsured rate went from 17.2 percent in 2013 to a new historic low of 7.2 percent in 2017.

Before the passage of the ACA, people were routinely denied health insurance coverage due to preexisting conditions such as asthma, cancer, or heart disease. Others were sold coverage that excluded care for their preexisting conditions. After January 1, 2014 when the guarantee issue provision of the ACA went into effect, many individuals gained affordable, comprehensive coverage. The California Department of Insurance heard from numerous people with preexisting conditions who had previously been denied health insurance coverage and were grateful that they could now buy health insurance for the first time in years.

An estimated 5.9 million Californians have preexisting conditions, so the repeated efforts to repeal the ACA in 2017 and 2018 caused distress and concern for the millions of people with preexisting conditions and their families. During the time the Congress was considering repeal of the ACA, the Department and I heard from people who were very afraid that they would not be able to buy health insurance in the future and would not be able to get the medical care they need. In addition to the millions of Californians who already have preexisting conditions, any one of us may find ourselves with a preexisting condition in the future, and could find ourselves uninsurable in the future without the protections in the ACA. These protections are a promise we have made to the American people, one which we should never break. I will stand up against any attempts to weaken or dismantle the Affordable Care Act given what is at stake for Californians who rely upon its protections.”

 

Source link: California Department of Insurance

 

Pot Tax Cuts: The sale of cannabis products are slower than anticipated. Sales are down. More importantly — for the state, that is — tax revenues aren’t up to expectations.

 

California Treasurer Fiona Ma says the solution is tax cuts for marijuana businesses. The cuts are needed — as opponents noted — because the state put very high taxes onto pot growers and sellers. They warned it would cause prices to rise, sales to fall and would send consumers scurrying back to the black market.

How bad is it? The marijuana taxes fell $101 million short of what was expected.

In her comments on the issue — and the bill designed to fix the problem — Ma said, “This is anywhere from a $6 billion to a $20 billion industry in California. So we want to help them … get into the regulated market and come in from the gray market.”

If the bill passes, the new law will give those in the cannabis business a three-year tax break and will reduce the excise tax from 15% to 11% and will suspend taxes for pot growers completely through 2022.

Currently growers are taxed at a $148 per pound rate.

 

Source link: Press Democrat

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By staff reporter, Tuesday, January 29, 2019


 

California

Montecito Mudslides: Edison International says poorly designed and maintained debris basins are the reasons for the deadly mudslides that hit Montecito last year.

Over 20 people died. Damages to property is estimated at between $177 million and $204 million. The mudslides happened on January 18, 2018 when the first heavy rain of the season hit the top of the mountain above the city and loosed tons of mud and boulders onto the city.

Edison International has been sued for causing the mudslides because its equipment may have been responsible for the fire at the top of the mountain. The company — and its subsidiary Southern California Edison — countersued and blamed the city, the county and its inadequate infrastructure, and how that infrastructure was maintained.

In its complaint, Edison said, “With this cross-complaint we seek to ensure that there is a comprehensive review of the role many parties may have played in the large and tragic losses suffered by the community during the Montecito mudslides,” the company said. “It is well known that the Montecito area has always been at high risk for mudslides and debris flows. We believe that city, county and state governments, including flood control, water and transportation agencies, failed to ensure that Montecito’s infrastructure was adequate to reduce the impact of such natural disasters.”

 

Source link: Insurance Journal

 

Idaho

Medicare Workshops to be Offered in Bonners Ferry: A series of three (3) free Medicare Workshop for individuals turning 65 and those approaching Medicare eligibility will be held Friday, February 1 at the Fry Healthcare Education Center, located across from the main hospital building of the Boundary Community Hospital, 6640 Kaniksu St., in Bonners Ferry.  Workshops will be held at 2:30, 4:30 and 6 p.m.

Caregivers and all those interested in learning how Medicare works are encouraged to attend.

The workshop will be led by Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), a unit of the Idaho Department of Insurance.  SHIBA presenters will introduce the various parts of Medicare and explain some of the vocabulary associated with the program. 

Topics to be covered include:

  Timeframes for enrolling in Medicare

  Enrollment periods for Medigap, Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plans

  How the different parts of Medicare work together — and when they don’t

To register for the workshop, please contact the SHIBA office at 1-800-247-4422.

 

Washington

Wildfire Mitigation Plan: Public Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz has unveiled a 10-year, $55 billion wildfire control plan and given it to the Legislature. The plan will add 30-full time and 40 seasonal firefighters to the Department of Natural Resources. It also adds two helicopters to the firefighting air fleet.

A wildfire training academy that can be used by other agencies will also be set up.

Source link: Claims Journal

 

Commissioner’s Legislative Priority

Click here for Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler’s legislative priorities.

Actions by the Commissioner

Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler issued fines in December 2018 totaling $192,050 against insurance companies, agents and brokers who violated state insurance regulations.

Insurance companies

Accordia Life and Annuity Co., Des Moines, Iowa; fined $130,000, order 18-0250

Kreidler received 57 complaints about the company in 2016 and 2017 and started an investigation into its practices. The law violations included:

 Failure to maintain full and adequate records of more than 8,600 customer accounts.

Underpaid interest on the death benefit of a policy and failed to correct the problem until the consumer complained to Kreidler’s office. State law requires that insurance companies pay 8 percent interest.

Failed to provide annual statements to 21 consumers.

State Farm Life Insurance Co., fined $10,000, order 18-0410

The company failed to pay the correct amount of interest on death benefits to 1,251 Washington consumers. State law requires that insurance companies pay 8 percent interest.

Kreidler fined the following companies for violating Washington state insurance regulations:

    GPM Health and Life Insurance Co., Spokane, Wash.; fined $2,000, order 18-0468

    Monterey Insurance Co., Monterey, Calif.; fined $30,000, order 18-0490

    American Automobile Insurance Co., Earth City, Mo..; fined $10,000, order 18-0494

    Unified Life Insurance Co., Dallas; fined $4,500, order 18-0529

 

Agents and brokers

Kreidler revoked the licenses of the following insurance producers:

  Romaine Smith, Prosser, Wash.; license revoked, order 18-0146

  Francisca Yadira Rios, Pasco, Wash.; license revoked, order 18-0507

  Jacqueline Cone, Washougal, Wash.; license revoked, order 18-0515

  Jodi S. Campbell, Lonoke, Ark.; license revoked, order 18-0475

  Gary M. Enciso, Long Beach, Calif.; license revoked, order 18-0476

  Rachel Glover, Collins, Iowa; license revoked, order 18-0477

  Drucilla Clorene Wilson, Las Vegas; license revoked, order 18-0479

  Paul B. Wells, Las Vegas, license revoked, order 18-0498

  Deandre Maze-Carter, Phoenix; license revoked, order 18-0499

  American Underwriting Services LLC, Kennesaw, Ga.; license revoked, order 18-0503

  Romeo Evan Fulton, North Riverside, Ill.; license suspended, order 18-0504

  James Luis Vasquez, Bothell, Wash.; revocation rescinded, license surrendered, order 18-0480

 

Kreidler fined the following insurance producers for violating state laws:

  David M. Connolly and David Connolly Insurance Agency, Silverdale, Wash.; fined $500, order 18-0355

  Ryan M. Focht, Pullman, Wash.; fined $500, order 18-0482

  Alina Frenkel, Bellevue, Wash.; fined $500, order 18-0483

  Robert L. Johnston, Spokane, Wash.; fined $500, order 18-0491

  Paul F. Dent and Griffin Mac Lean, Inc., Bellevue, Wash.; fined $1,000, order 18-0488

  John C. Haskell, Jr., Mill Creek, Wash.; fined $250, order 18-0397

  Xandrea Powell, Suwanee, Ga.; fined $250, order 18-0395

  Terran Watters-Fletcher, Lawrencville, Ga.; fined $250, order 18-0401

  Benchmark Administrators LLC, Wayzata, Minn.; fined $250, order 18-0429

  Lawrence M. Koresko, Collegeville, Penn.; fined $250, order 18-0436

  George Lewis Kengle, Springfield, Ore.; fined $250, order 18-0478

  Thomas A. Dus, Elyria, Ohio; fiend $500, order 18-0506

 

Continuing education providers

  Risk & Insurance Managers Society of Washington, Seattle; fined $800, order 18-0513

 

 

 

 

Source link: Washington Department of Insurance

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  insurance content  insurance news  Weekly Industry News 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By staff reporter, Tuesday, January 22, 2019

California

Lara & Federal Shutdown: Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara strongly urges that insurance companies assist Californians who are affected by the Federal Government shutdown and may face delays in paying premiums or cancellation of policies. The Commissioner is asking insurers to be patient and work with these California residents during this difficult time.

 “The Federal shutdown is putting Californians at unnecessary risk of losing insurance coverage over late or unpaid bills,” said Commissioner Lara. “I am asking insurers to partner with me to protect our federal workers and contractors in California to give them some peace of mind during this time of uncertainty.”

The partial shutdown of the Federal Government is negatively affecting many California consumers, specifically those employed by the Federal Government and contractors who are not being paid their regular salary or receiving reimbursements when normally due. This delay in payment affects these consumers’ ability to pay their bills on time including insurance coverage, mortgages or other loans.

Commissioner Lara asks insurers to take into consideration the difficulties California consumers are facing and will continue to face until the current shutdown has ended. He urges insurers to relax due dates for premium payments, extend grace periods, waive late fees and penalties, allow forbearance with regard to the cancellation/non-renewal of policies, allow payment plans for premium payments, and exercise judicious efforts to assist affected policyholders and work with them to make sure that their insurance policies do not lapse.

Source link: California Department of Insurance

Idaho

Medicare Workshops: Free Medicare Workshops for individuals turning 65 and those approaching Medicare eligibility have been scheduled in two Idaho cities.

The first is Thursday, January 24 from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Syringa Hospital Soltman Center, 600 W. Main St., Grangeville, Idaho. 

The second is Monday, January 28, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center, 415 6th St., Lewiston, Idaho.

Caregivers and all those interested in learning how Medicare works are encouraged to attend.

 The workshop will be led by Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), a unit of the Idaho Department of Insurance. SHIBA presenters will introduce the various parts of Medicare and explain some of the vocabulary associated with the program. 

Topics to be covered include:

• Timeframes for enrolling in Medicare

• Enrollment periods for Medigap, Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plans

• How the different parts of Medicare work together – and when they don’t

 To register for the workshops, please contact the SHIBA office at 1-800-247-4422.

Nevada

Highway Fatalities: the Department of Public Safety is worried. Nevada’s highway fatalities rose to a 10-year high. The department said 331 people died 2018 in 301 crashes.

Department spokesman Andrew Bennett said most of them were in Clark County. “In 2008 we were at 324, then we dropped to the mid 200s from about 2009 to 2013 and we then we saw a steady climb into the 300s in 2014,” he said. “So, 331 is on the high end in the last decade, but we have seen a 4 percent population growth over the past two years in the state as well.”

Pedestrian deaths in Nevada dropped from 98 in 2017 o 80 last year. Bennett said it is the first decrease in nine years.

Source link: Insurance Journal

Washington

The Commissioner’s 2019 legislative priorities: Surprise billing (HB 1065 and SB 5031 "Protecting consumers from charges for out-of-network health care services")

This legislation will stop patients from getting an additional bill, after the patient’s health plan has paid the normal rate and the patient has paid their portion (such as a co-pay) when they receive medical care for an emergency at an out-of-network emergency room and when they have an approved surgery at an in-network hospital or surgery center but receive services, such as anesthesiology, radiology or lab services, from a provider who is out-of-network.

The prime sponsor of HB 1065 is Rep. Cody. The prime sponsor of SB 5031 is Sen. Rolfes.

HB complete bill language (leg.wa.gov) (PDF, 181.46 KB)

   HB bill history (leg.wa.gov)

   HB Status: Public Hearing, January 23, 2019, 1:30pm

   SB complete bill language (leg.wa.gov) (PDF, 176.78 KB)

   SB bill history (leg.wa.gov)

   SB Status: Referred to Health & Long Term Care Committee

Disaster resilience working group (HB 1040 and SB 5106 "Concerning the creation of a work group to study and make recommendations on natural disaster mitigation and resiliency activities")

This legislation will create a work group composed of legislators, state agencies, insurance companies and other key stakeholders to review and make recommendations on how to best coordinate and improve disaster resiliency work in Washington State, including possibly creating a central place for coordination and planning.

The prime sponsor of HB 1040 is Rep. Reeves. The prime sponsor of SB 5106 is Sen. Das.

  HB complete bill language (PDF, 68.24 KB)

   HB bill history (leg.wa.gov)

   HB Status: Public Hearing, January 16, 2019, 8:00am/Executive Session, January 22, 2019, 10:00am/Executive Session, January 23, 2019, 8:00am

   SB complete bill language (leg.wa.gov)

   SB bill history (leg.wa.gov)

   SB Status: Public Hearing, January 15, 2019, 8:00am/Executive Action, January 17, 2019, 8:30am

Medicare access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) (SB 5032 "Concerning Medicare supplemental insurance policies")

This legislation will align Washington law with recent changes in the Medicare and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) statutes, which seek to prevent overutilization of services. Washington must have these changes in place by January 1, 2020. The two key changes are:

As of January 1, 2020, new enrollees will no longer be able to purchase a Medicare Supplement Plan which provides coverage for the Part B deductible. This does not impact existing enrollees.

Allow but not require companies to offer a new Plan G with a High Deductible option. Currently, only Plan F has an additional High Deductible option.

The prime sponsor of SB 5032 is Sen. Cleveland.

   SB complete bill language (leg.wa.gov) (PDF, 86.39 KB)

   SB bill history (leg.wa.gov)

   SB Status: Public Hearing, January 18, 2019, 8:00am

Criminal Investigations Unit (CIU) Separate Funding (HB 1069 "Concerning the creation of the insurance fraud surcharge account")

This legislation will create a dedicated funding stream for the Office of the Insurance Commissioner’s (OIC) Criminal Investigation Unit (CIU), who are charged with investigating and preventing insurance fraud. The legislation will also increase that funding to allow CIU to keep up with the increasing amount of fraud referrals by adding five new staff. The funding will be provided by dedicating a portion of the premium surcharge already collected by the OIC for CIU’s exclusive use.

The prime sponsor of HB 1069 is Rep. Stanford

   HB complete bill language (leg.wa.gov) (PDF, 82.11 KB)

   HB bill history (leg.wa.gov)

   HB Status: Public Hearing, January 16, 2019, 1:30pm/Executive Session, January 18, 2019, 9:00am

Source link: Washington Department of Insurance

Kreidler and Innovators: Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler is offering innovators in the insurance industry a new way to engage his office about potential products that may benefit consumers.

Kreidler announced an insurance innovation portal, Resources for insurance industry innovators.

Click here to access the portal that includes guidelines, a hotline and web form. This is designed to encourage companies, agents and insurance startups to contact his office early in the development of new products.

Kreidler noted that changing social and technological trends have created an opportunity for insurance entrepreneurs. 

“The insurance industry is constantly evolving and we want to make sure innovators understand the laws that guide insurance regulation in Washington,” Kreidler said. “We are eager to work with innovators as they prepare to bring products to market. We’re committed to fair and efficient regulation.”

The Office of the Insurance Commissioner regulates Washington’s $42 billion insurance industry. For more information, please visit www.insurance.wa.gov

Source link: Washington Department of Insurance

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  insurance content  insurance industry 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By Staff Reporter, Tuesday, January 8, 2019

/resource/resmgr/2019/win/usual_suspects_banners/around_the_western_alliance.jpg

 

California

Regulations on Gender Discrimination in Auto Insurance: California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones has issued new regulations that prohibit the use of gender in private passenger automobile insurance rating in California. The Gender Non-Discrimination in Automobile Insurance Rating Regulation became effective on January 1, 2019.

“My priority as Insurance Commissioner is to protect all California consumers, and these regulations ensure that auto insurance rates are based on factors within a driver’s control, rather than personal characteristics over which drivers have no control,” said Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones.

This is not the first regulatory action Commissioner Jones has taken to prevent gender-based discrimination in California’s insurance industry. In 2012, the Commissioner promulgated regulations that prohibit and prevent the denial of coverage or denial of claims for medical services based upon an insured or prospective insured’s actual or perceived gender identity. Prior to his election as Insurance Commissioner, then Assemblymember Jones authored legislation (Assembly Bill 119, in 2009) to prohibit gender-based discrimination in the pricing of health insurance. Thanks to that law, California eliminated gender-based pricing in health insurance before that became the national standard under the Affordable Care Act.

The Commissioner’s Gender Non-Discrimination in Automobile Insurance Rating Regulation mandates that all automobile insurance companies operating in California file a revised class plan that eliminates the use of gender as a rating factor.

Source link: California Department of Insurance

 

New Regs on Average Medical Service Contract Rate: Under the leadership of Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones, the California Department of Insurance adopted new regulations to implement provisions of Assembly Bill 72 (Chapter 492, Statutes of 2016). These regulations relate to the average contracted rate that a non-contracted medical professional will be paid when an insured seeks medical services at an in-network medical facility and is treated by an out-of-network provider. These average contracted rate regulations were approved by the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) and go into effect on January 1, 2019.

AB 72 protects consumers from surprise medical bills when they go to an in-network health facility and receive care from an out-of-network provider without specifically consenting to out-of-network care. The law also establishes a payment amount of 125 percent of the Medicare rate or the average contracted rate in that geographic region for that out-of-network medical service, whichever of the two is greater. These new regulations issued by the department provide the methodology for determining the "average contacted rate" for the medical service that insurers must use to reimburse non-contracting medical professionals. This will reduce disputes between insurers and medical providers about reimbursement rates for non-contracted medical care by providing a clear methodology for rate calculation for commonly billed services at in-network medical facilities.

Under these new regulations, the average contracted rate will be the average of the contracted commercial rates paid by a health insurer for the same or similar health care services in the baseline year (2015) in the geographic region in which the service was provided, with the rate then adjusted for inflation based on the date the medical service was provided.

"These regulations were carefully crafted to provide a fair way of calculating the average contracted rate for medical services in a given geographic region in those circumstances in which a patient inadvertently receives care from an out-of-network provider. Insurers are required to maintain an adequate provider network to ensure timely access to care for their policyholders and when patients are forced to go out-of-network at an in-network facility, the patient should not have to pay more for their care and the providers should be reimbursed fairly," explained Commissioner Jones.

The consumer protection in AB 72 that prevents policyholders from surprise medical bills for non-emergency care went into effect on July 1, 2017, and ensures that when consumers seek medical care at a facility in their insurer's network, but receive care from an out-of-network medical provider, they only have to pay their in-network cost sharing. The law also called for the Insurance Commissioner to set up an Independent Dispute Resolution (IDR) system that providers can use if they do not believe they have been paid fairly under the law. The IDR program was developed by the department for use by medical providers and insurers starting in September 1, 2017.

Source link: California Department of Insurance

 

Supreme Court Decision Fair Claims

 After a decade of legal wrangling over the regulations that implement the Unfair Insurance Practices Act (UIPA), the California Supreme Court let stand the decision of California Court of Appeal, 4th Appellate District, upholding the Insurance Commissioner's Fair Claims Settlement Practices Regulations, which prescribe how insurance companies must process insurance claims. The regulations are the foundation in determining the number of violations committed when assessing fines against insurers that have committed unfair claims practices.

Department of Insurance examinations of PacifiCare's claims-handling uncovered evidence of numerous unfair claims practices-which included wrongful denials for life-saving treatment for people battling serious illness and claim payment denials for providers and hospitals-all because the insurer was focused on maximizing profits through what it called "efficiencies" after the 2015 botched $9 billion acquisition of PacifiCare by UnitedHealthcare. The Department examinations also uncovered evidence the company was well aware of the egregious issues.

Under the Insurance Code, these unfair acts or practices include misrepresenting what medications or treatments an insurance policy covers, failing to promptly pay claims where liability is reasonably clear, and forcing claimants to file lawsuits to get full payment, and other acts. The Insurance Code allows the commissioner to impose fines of up to $5,000 each time an insurer commits an unfair act or practice on a consumer, or up to $10,000 each time if the insurer did so willfully.

"UnitedHealthcare purchased PacifiCare and imposed cost-cutting measures that destroyed PacifiCare's claims-handling processes and its arguments in litigation that insurance companies should be allowed to willfully harm consumers as long as they don't do it too often, reflect a gross disregard of the lives and well-being of the consumers who paid for the promise of coverage," Commissioner Jones said. "Customers have no choice but to rely on the integrity of their health insurance companies. PacifiCare breached that trust. By any measure, 908,000 violations reflect a general business practice of violating consumer protection laws. I am delighted the Supreme Court has rejected further challenges to the insurance commissioner's authority to punish insurance companies for knowingly harming even one consumer."

Based on departmental examination results and following an administrative hearing that took three years, Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones found PacifiCare committed 908,547 separate violations of the UIPA, and he imposed fines aggregating $173,603,750 in penalties. On behalf of PacifiCare, UnitedHealthcare sued the commissioner, arguing that none of its harmful conduct violated the Insurance Code.

PacifiCare argued that insurers are immune from fines for committing these unfair acts, even if the insurer did so intentionally, unless the commissioner is also able to show that the insurer knew it had committed the acts frequently enough to constitute a "general business practice." The court of appeal rejected the argument, stating: "PacifiCare's interpretation of section 790.03(h) is not only internally problematic, it stands in contrast to virtually every other statute the Legislature has enacted in connection with (1) enforcement of the Insurance Code against insurers generally; (2) enforcement of the UIPA in particular; and (3) the imposition of administrative penalties against insurers in other contexts."

The court also rejected PacifiCare's argument that the commissioner must prove an insurer had "actual knowledge" of its illegal conduct and held that it was within the commissioner's authority to hold the insurer responsible if its agents or employees were aware of facts that would cause a reasonable person to know of the violations. The court also found the commissioner's reasoning was sensible in that restricting the definition of "knowingly" to one particular individual's actual knowledge would fail to take into account that many people handle a claim, and an unfair practice can be committed by cumulative acts, not simply the intentional act of one person."

Further, the court of appeal also upheld the commissioner's interpretation that an insurer's "willful" violation of the act may be established by showing a purpose or willingness to commit the act and agreed that penalties for willful violations do not need to require a showing that the insurer intended to violate the law or injure someone. The court held, "As the Commissioner points out, he engaged in an extensive, formal rulemaking process in the course of promulgating these regulations. That careful consideration, combined with the Commissioner's expertise in the area, weighs in favor of according significant deference to the Commissioner's interpretation of the terms, and we do so."

Source link: California Department of Insurance

 

Wells Fargo Settlement

 Wells Fargo has agreed to pay a $10 million penalty as part of a settlement agreement with the California Department of Insurance. This settlement resolves the department’s accusation alleging improper insurance sales practices related to Wells Fargo’s online insurance referral program. The improper practices resulted in consumers being signed up and charged for insurance products without their consent.

“The Department of Insurance’s investigation found that Wells Fargo was signing up and charging customers for insurance without their consent,” said Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones. “Banks and other financial institutions should never be allowed to prey on their customers’ trust without being held accountable.”

Wells Fargo has agreed to not transact any new business during the remaining term of its two insurance licenses, which expire in July and September 2020, respectively. The company also agreed to not apply for a license for at least two years following the expiration of their current licenses. Wells Fargo has provided restitution to all California consumers who were charged premiums, bank fees and other direct monetary losses connected to the unauthorized insurance policies.

$5 million of the penalty is due immediately. If the company ever seeks to return to the California insurance marketplace, it will then pay the remaining $5 million penalty. The Department may also decline to issue a new license.

In November 2017, the department served on Wells Fargo an accusation seeking revocation of Wells Fargo’s insurance license for improper insurance sales practices. The accusation was the result of an investigation opened at the direction of Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones, which found that from 2008 to 2016, Wells Fargo customers were issued approximately 1,500 insurance policies without their knowledge or permission. In some cases, employees told consumers to enter their personal information on a policy application merely to receive a quote, but Wells Fargo employees later submitted the application to the insurer to purchase the policy without the consumer’s permission.

Source link: California Department of Insurance

 

Idaho

Drunk Driver Interlock Law

Starting this year ignition interlock devices are required for the vehicles of all drivers getting a first-time drunken driving conviction. The device will be connected to the vehicle for one-year.

In the past, the blow-into-a-mouthpiece device was only required for repeat offenders.

 

Source link: Insurance Journal

 

Nevada

Marijuana Sales: The Nevada Department of Taxation says marijuana sales in the state are quite brisk. October’s figures were released late last year and sales hit $42 million. That means $8.24 million in tax revenue for the state.

Sales from July through October of 2018 were almost half of the projected sales for the entire year.

Revenues are expected to go even higher since the state issued 61 more dispensary licenses in December bringing the total to 65.

Source link: Insurance Journal

 

Oregon

Off Duty Pot Use for State Workers

The Oregon Legislature is considering a bill that will make it illegal to fire an employee who fails a marijuana drug test if they used marijuana while off the clock.

The rationale is that it is unfair to penalize an employee for using a substance that is legal to use in the state.

Senate Bill 301 will not allow employees to use marijuana if their collective bargaining agreement says they cannot do that even while not working. So exemptions are in the bill for labor agreements, workers who are under the influence while working or from federal jobs that require employees to have a drug free workplace in order to receive federal dollars.

Source link: Insurance Journal

 

From the Department of Insurance: The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently adopted the following rule: ID 39-2018: Establishes reimbursement rates for out-of-network services provided at in-network health care facilities

 

Rules affected: OAR 836-150-0010, 836-150-0020, 836-150-0030, 836-150-0040, 836-150-0050, 836-150-0060

 

Rule Summary: Clarifies the purpose, statutory authority, and applicability for OAR 836-053-1600 to 836-053-1615. Adopt definitions of: anesthesia conversion factor; base units; base rate; CMS; CPT; CPI adjustment; director; geographic rating area; modifier adjustment; out-of-network reimbursement; physical status units; Q modifier adjustment; and time units. Adopt formula for out-of-network reimbursement for non-anesthesia-related claims. Adopt formula for out-of-network reimbursement for anesthesia-related claims.

Filed: December 19, 2018

Effective: January 1, 2019

Documents:

Permanent Administrative Order — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id39-2018_rule-order.pdf

Summary of Testimony and Hearing Officer's Report — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id39-2018_ho-rec.pdf

Appendix A: Non-anesthesia reimbursement base rate — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/OAR/div53-1605_exA.pdf

 

The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently adopted the following rule: ID 38-2018: Implementing the Oregon Reinsurance Program

 

Rules affected: OAR 836-150-0010, 836-150-0020, 836-150-0030, 836-150-0040, 836-150-0050, 836-150-0060

 

Rule Summary: Explains the purpose of the Oregon Reinsurance Program. Defines benefit year, department, reinsurance eligible claim, reinsurance eligible issuer and reinsurance payment. Lists the reporting requirements and payment processes to receive reinsurance payments. Establishes the attachment point, reinsurance cap and coinsurance rate for the benefit years 2018 and 2019. Describes how and when reinsurance payments are to be made. Describes the duties of the Oregon Reinsurance Program administrator.

 

Filed: December 19, 2018

Effective: January 1, 2019

Documents:

Permanent Administrative Order — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id38-2018_rule-order.pdf

Summary of Testimony and Hearing Officer's Report — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id38-2018_ho-rec.pdf

 

The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently adopted the following rule: ID 37-2018: Update to adoption of the Valuation Manual for principle-based reserving

Rules affected: OAR 836-031-0605

Rule Summary: Designates the version of the Valuation Manual insurers must use in establishing principle-based reserves beginning January 1, 2019, and confirms that the operative date of the Valuation Manual is January 1, 2017 under section 16(2) of Oregon Laws 2015 chapter 547.

Filed: December 19, 2018

Effective: January 1, 2019

Documents:

Permanent Administrative Order — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id37-2018_rule-order.pdf

Summary of Testimony and Hearing Officer's Report — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id37-2018_ho-rec.pdf

 

The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently adopted the following rule: ID 36-2018: Adoption of 2018 annual and 2019 quarterly statement blanks and instructions for insurers

Rules affected: OAR 836-011-0000

Rule Summary: Amended annually to prescribe the statement blanks and applicable instructions then in effect.

Filed: December 19, 2018

Effective: January 1, 2019

 

Documents:

Permanent Administrative Order — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id36-2018_rule-order.pdf

Summary of Testimony and Hearing Officer's Report — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id36-2018_ho-rec.pdf

 

The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation recently adopted the following rule: ID 35-2018: Update to morbidity standards for valuation of individual and group health insurance policies

Rules affected: OAR 836-031-0270

Rule Summary: The rule sets forth the minimum standards to be used by insurers for the valuation of specified benefits, and the computation of contract reserves and claim reserves, for individual and group health insurance policies.

Filed: December 19, 2018

Effective: December 19, 2018

Documents:

 

Permanent Administrative Order — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id35-2018_rule-order.pdf

Summary of Testimony and Hearing Officer's Report — https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/id35-2018_ho-rec.pdf

 

Establishment of Oregon Prescription Drug Price Transparency Program, reporting requirements, fees, civil penalties

Rules affected: OAR OAR 836-053-0473, 836-200-0500, 836-200-0505, 836-200-0510, 836-200-0515, 836-200-0520, 836-200-0525, 836-200-0530, 836-200-0535, 836-200-0540, 836-200-0545, 836-200-0550, 836-200-0555, 836-200-0560

Need for Rules:

The Prescription Drug Price Transparency Act (2018 Oregon House Bill 4005, enrolled at 2018 Oregon Laws, Chapter 7) directs the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) to establish a reporting program for prescription drug manufacturers and health insurance carriers to increase the transparency of prescription drug pricing in Oregon. This program will be known as the Oregon Prescription Drug Price Transparency program. The law directs DCBS to engage in rulemaking to define key terms and timelines, and empowers DCBS to establish fees, adopt a schedule of civil penalties for violations and adopt any other rules necessary for carrying out the provisions of Section 2 of the law.

The proposed rule establishes:

  Definitions for key terms including “new prescription drug,” “net annual increase,” “one month supply” and “course of treatment” that clarify the circumstances when a report is required;

  Form, manner and content requirements for reports from drug manufacturers;

  DCBS’s supervisory expectations of participating drug manufacturers, including good faith standards;

  Timelines for DCBS to request additional information relating to drug manufacturer reports, and for manufacturers’ responses;

  DCBS’s process for adjudicating trade secret claims from drug manufacturers;

  Timelines for DCBS to make drug manufacturer reports publicly available, subject to applicable trade secret exemptions;

  DCBS’s process for receiving notices from consumers about prescription drug price increases;

  Establishing an annual $400 fee for drug manufacturers, as well as an additional surcharge fee for manufacturers that file reports with DCBS;

  Adopting a schedule of civil penalties for drug manufacturer violations; and

  Requirements for information on drug pricing to be provided by health insurance carriers in rate filings.

The proposed rules are necessary to ensure that the program is administered in a fair and equal manner for all participating drug manufacturers and health insurance carriers, to minimize the administrative burden and cost of the program for the state and the industry, and to achieve the program’s purpose of providing notice and disclosure of information relating to the cost and pricing of prescription drugs in order to provide accountability for prescription drug pricing.

Filed: December 28, 2018

Public hearing: January 22, 2019, 10:00 a.m.

Last day for public comment: February 1, 2019, 5 p.m.

The agency requests public comment on whether other options should be considered for achieving the rule's substantive goals while reducing the negative economic impact of the rule on business.

 

For more information on this proposed rule and others, please visit the Division's website:

dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Pages/proposed-rules.aspx

 

Washington

The Department of Insurance Issues Fines: Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler disciplined and issued fines in November 2018 totaling $700,500 against insurance companies, agents, brokers and others who violated state insurance regulations.

Insurance companies

Dental Health Services, Seattle; fined $500,000, order 18-0437

Kreidler fined the dental insurer for:

  Failing to identify and process 23 policyholders’ appeals.

  Failing to identify and process 342 grievances from policyholders.

  Erroneously canceling polices.

  Double-charging 492 policyholders a total of $56,351. The company refunded the money with an additional $5,635 in interest.

  Failing to deliver enrollment materials to 76 policyholders.

In addition to the fine, Kreidler will prohibit the company from selling new policies for at least 12 months. After the probationary period, the company can ask Kreidler to allow it to sell policies if it completes compliance and corrective action plans to the commissioner’s satisfaction. Kreidler is suspending $400,000 of the fine and will impose additional penalties if the company fails to comply with the terms of the order.

Kreidler previously took action against Dental Health Services in 2017 and 2018. Kreidler fined the company $400,000 for mishandling consumer complaints and other issues.

 

American Pet Insurance Co., New York City; fined $10,000, order 16-0127

Kreidler imposed $10,000 of a suspended fine against the pet insurance company for failing to follow the compliance plan it agreed to in July 2016. The plan includes a self-audit, which revealed that one policyholder was charged the incorrect premium and eight policyholders did not receive the required 30-day notice for a rate change. Kreidler previously suspended $100,000 of the $250,000 to ensure compliance with the terms of the order. This is the first portion of the suspended fine that Kreidler has imposed on the company.

 

Kreidler disciplined the following companies for violating state insurance regulations:

  Country Mutual Insurance Co., Bloomington, Ill.; fined $50,000, order 18-0409

  Nationwide Agribusiness Insurance Co., Des Moines, Iowa; fined $25,000, order 18-0425

  Amica Mutual Insurance Co., Lincoln, R.I.; fined $20,000, order 18-0424

  Zurich American Insurance Co., New York City; fined $20,000, order 16-0107

  Horace Mann Insurance Co., Springfield, Ill.; fined $10,000, order 18-0408

  Garrison Property & Casualty Insurance Co., San Antonio, Texas; fined $10,000, order 18-0433

  Stillwater Insurance Co., Santa Barbara, Calif.; fined $10,000, order 18-0474

  Allied World Specialty Insurance Co., Wilmington, Del.; fined $3,500, order 18-0458

  Amica Mutual Insurance Co., Lincoln, R.I.; fined $3,000, order 18-0444

 

Agents and brokers

Kreidler disciplined the following insurance producers for violating state insurance regulations:

  Michelle F. Boyer, Parker, Colo.; fined $2,500, order 18-0390

  Rashun Mann, Mansfield, Texas; fined $500, order 18-0380

  Reed Jeff Insurance Agency and Jeffrey Reed, Silverdale, Wash.; fined $250, order 18-0363

  Steele Group Insurance Agency, Inc., and Kelly S. Steele, Eugene, Ore.; fined $250, order 18-0416

  Gentry Partners Ltd.; Greenwich, Conn.; fined $250, order 18-0440

  Bruce Gilchrist, San Carlos, Calif.; fined $250, order 18-0396

  Larry P. Chinn, Memphis, Tenn.; license revoked, order 18-0398

  Kathy Ann Graham, Fort Pierce, Fla.; license revoked, order 18-0427

  Andrea Godoy, Clovis, Calif.; license revoked, order 18-0428

  Tiana Tam, Everett, Wash.; probationary license issued, order 18-0438

  Kiara Munguia, Las Vegas; license revoked, order 18-0445

  Juan Alberto Porras, Phoenix; license revoked, order 18-0430

  Glenn Chavious, Hull, Mass.; license revoked, order 18-0431

  Bijan Richards, Omaha; license revoked, order 18-0432

  April Holmes, Mesa, Ariz.; license revoked, order 18-0435

 

Other organizations

  Credit Acceptance Corp., Southfield, Mich.; fined $30,000, order 18-0426

  Kreidler fined the company for selling nearly 10,000 guaranteed asset protection waivers to Washington consumers via car dealerships without being registered.

  Device Doctorz of Clermont LLC, dba Insure Apple, Oviedo, Fla.; ordered to cease and desist, order 18-0462; fined $5,000, order 18-0463

A Washington state consumer complained to Kreidler’s office when Insure Apple denied his claim for the loss of his iPhone. Upon review, the commissioner found the company sold insurance without a license in Washington state. Altogether, it illegally sold 37 policies for $4,436 in premiums.

 

Source link: Washington Department of Insurance

 

Workers’ Compensation Price Drop

The Washington Department of Insurance said the price for workers’ compensation is going to fall for most businesses in 2019.

Department L&I Director Joel Sacks said the drop will average about 5% and will be the largest drop in over 10-years. “We’re seeing fewer injuries on the job and we’ve made improvements in helping injured workers heal and return to work. That’s good news for workers and employers, and it’s helping us significantly lower workers’ compensation costs,” Sacks said.

Employers will pay about $58 less per employee. The drop for workers will average about $6 year. Estimated total premium savings for businesses in the state will be about $136 million in 2019.

Of course all of this changes from industry to industry. Some will pay more. Others less.

  Building and construction workers’ premiums will decrease by 9%

  Agricultural workers’ and food processors’ premiums will drop by 2%

  Healthcare workers’ premiums will fall by 4%

  Forest products workers’ premiums will go down 6%

  Government workers’ and school employees’ premiums will see a 3% drop

  Restaurant and hotel workers’ premiums will fall an estimated 6%

Not all areas will see a drop:

  City and county law enforcement officers’ premiums will rise by 8%

  City and county firefighters’ will see a 6% hike

Source link: Chinook Observer

 


Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  insurance content 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By Staff Reporter, Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Alaska

Unsafe Buildings: Since the 7.0 earthquake a couple of weeks ago in Alaska, buildings in Anchorage continue to be looked at for safety. To date more than 100 of them have been deemed unsafe.

 

Source link: Insurance Journal

 

California

Insurance Department Website: The California Department of Insurance (CDI) has sent letters to admitted property and casualty writers and trade associations to inform them that the department will be adding an "Insurance Marketplace" feature to its website to provide information to consumers about property and casualty specialty or niche products offered by admitted insurers.

The letter gives admitted property and casualty writers the opportunity to include their company as one of the insurers offering niche or specialty products and asks for their cooperation. The department urges insurers to utilize this free publicity.

The purpose of the "Insurance Marketplace" webpages would be to enable the CDI to provide consumers with a new, centralized resource in their search for harder-to-find products that may not be readily accessed through their local agents or brokers. This might include insurance for marinas, wineries, pet insurance, restaurants, schools, and much more.

CDI is not endorsing any of the listed participants over other licensees. Participation in the "Insurance Marketplace" by insurers is completely voluntary and the list is not purporting to be a complete listing of all insurers that write the listed products.

 

Oregon

Oregon to update driver license, ID card design: The next time you renew your Oregon driver license or identification card you may see a new design with new security features. DMV is rolling out a new card design starting this winter and early 2019.

The beauty of the new cards isn’t just skin deep. The enhanced colorful look is part of the new card’s advanced security features, making it harder to alter or duplicate.

Your current driver license or ID card will remain valid until its expiration date, so you do not need to replace your card before that date. You also do not need to replace your card when you move within Oregon – you can file your new address online at OregonDMV.com.

This is the first major upgrade to the card technology in Oregon since 2003. In addition to the new look and security features, the new card will provide a vertical layout for provisional driver license holders – drivers younger than 21 years old. This will make it easier to identify minors where age restrictions apply, such as the purchase of alcohol.

 

The new card will hold the same information as the current card, including name, address, issuance date and expiration date, as well as a small duplicate “ghost” image of the person’s photo. Driver license and ID card fees will remain the same with the new card.

 

Among the new security features:

  The card body is a durable plastic material made of a polycarbonate blend.

  Customer information is laser-etched in clear, highly defined lines.

  The colors are printed in tiny patterns that are difficult to see without magnification and difficult to duplicate.

  The clear laminate covering the card front shows a hologram of Oregon symbols at certain angles and light conditions.

 

 

For a preview of the new card design, watch a brief video on the ODOT channel here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzClU2yrAr0&feature=youtu.be

 

Insurance Bills for 2018

Here are the insurance-related Legislative Counsel (LC) bill drafts that are being released  during Legislative Days in committees which are sponsoring them. They will be renumbered with an actual bill number later.  But this gives you a sneak preview of some of the bills to come. Remember that many other non-committee bills will be released during the second week of January.  Please let me know if any of these cause you concerns.

 

LC 2638

https://apps.leg.state.or.us/liz/2017I1/Downloads/CommitteeMeetingDocument/153260

Provides that injured worker is eligible for vocational assistance unless average weekly wage exceeds 95 percent of weekly wage paid for employment in which worker was engaged at time of injury. Includes value of employer paid health insurance benefits in definition of earned income for purposes of determining whether worker is entitled to vocational rehabilitation because worker cannot engage in suitable employment. Provides that for purposes of determining suitable employment, worker’s weekly wage must be at least 95 percent of the average weekly wage paid for employment that was worker’s regular employment.

 

LC 2843

https://apps.leg.state.or.us/liz/2017I1/Downloads/CommitteeMeetingDocument/153264

Permits Department of Consumer and Business Services to issue licenses and conduct criminal records checks through Nationwide Multistate Licensing System. Requires certain applicants for licenses department issues to submit fingerprints for individuals with ownership interests in applicant and for individuals with supervisory authority over applicant’s operations. Becomes operative on January 1, 2020. Takes effect on 91st day following adjournment sine die.

 

LC 2869

https://apps.leg.state.or.us/liz/2017I1/Downloads/CommitteeMeetingDocument/153266

Specifies procedures Director of Department of Consumer and Business Services may use to investigate violations of Insurance Code. Permits complainant to submit complaint of violation to director and specifies required contents of complaint. Specifies procedures for director to investigate complaint and provides dates by which director must complete investigation. Permits director to engage in negotiations to settle complaint or to enter into remediation agreement to remedy violation. Requires director to issue order to remedy violation if settlement negotiations or negotiations for remedial agreement fail. Provides for person to bring action for violation of Insurance Code in specified circumstances. Becomes operative January 1, 2020. Declares emergency, effective on passage.

 

LC 3108

https://apps.leg.state.or.us/liz/2017I1/Downloads/CommitteeMeetingDocument/153268

Permits attending physician or authorized nurse practitioner to refer worker for treatment by chiropractic physician that is not member of managed care organization under specified circumstances.

 

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  Insurance Content  Insurance Industry  Insurance News 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Earn 20% commission: Hartford Flood

Posted By Joey Leffel, Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Here are some of the benefits to writing your clients a flood policy through the National Flood Insurance Program:

 

While there are benefits for your clients, there are also benefits for you as a PIA member:          

  • Guaranteed renewal through the NFIP
  • NFIP Policy accepted by banks
  • Cannot be dropped mid-term or during hurricane season
  • Not leaving the market
  • Unlimited capacity
  • Will write business anytime, no moratoriums
  • Backed by the Federal Government
  • An ease of doing business with The Hartford’s easy online quoting and issuing
  • Hands on service from a dedicated flood sales executive and transfer specialist
  • Free zone determinations.
  • On demand training and continuing education credits.
  • Competitive PIA member commission rates.

 

We'd like to discuss next steps with you!

Sue Smith

Flood Insurance Enrollment

(888) 246-4466 x 118

 

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  hartford flood program  insurance  insurance content 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By Staff Reporter, Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Arizona

Self-Driving Taxis: Alphabet’s Waymo has launched self-driving taxis in four suburbs of Phoenix: Chandler, Mesa, Tempe and Gilbert. The area covered by the vehicles is close to 100-miles.

Waymo has been testing this taxi technology since 2016 and is now ready to send them out to collect fares.

Riders download the Waymo app and give the company a credit card number. This is much like Uber and Lyft do. Once a ride is scheduled, the vehicle will be sent. A human driver accompanies the car but only to handle things if there is an emergency.

Source link: Insurance Journal

 

Idaho

Medicap Plan: There is still time for Idahoans under the age of 65 on Medicare to take advantage of a temporary three-month time period to purchase a Medicare supplement plan.  The additional time frame began October 1 and expires at midnight on December 31, 2018.  Separate from Medicare’s annual open enrollment period that runs October 15 to December 7, 2018, the three-month window allows those who qualified and enrolled for benefits under Medicare parts A and B to apply for or make changes to part D prescription drug plans and/or Medicare Advantage plans.

“Providing a second chance for our pre-65 consumers to enroll in a Medicare supplement, which closely aligns with the ability to purchase a standalone Medicare part D plan, is the right thing to do and in the best interest of those who qualify for this coverage,” said Director Dean Cameron.

In accordance with the state’s temporary rule change to IDAPA 18.01.54, effective October 1 through midnight December 31, 2018, carriers are required to accept Medicare Supplement applications from eligible individuals under the age of 65.  Newly eligible beneficiaries under 65 may also buy a Medicare supplement policy within six months of qualifying for coverage, effective January 1, 2018.

The Department established the separate three-month window after finding that some current beneficiaries were unaware of the open enrollment period that expired on June 30, 2018, and that the January to June period did not align with the part D prescription open enrollment period.

Medicare beneficiaries with questions can contact the Senior Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA) with the Idaho Department of Insurance at 800-247-4422.

 

Idaho

E-File for Premium Tax Filings: The goal of saving tax dollars while providing a convenience to those who submit Premium Tax filings and Continuation Fee Statements has led the Idaho Department of Insurance to adopt an E-file program, effective January 1, 2019.  By eliminating paper filings, the Department hopes to better utilize its resources and streamline all premium tax oversight responsibilities including regulatory obligations, security and the collection of funds.

Beginning January 1, the new E-file program will directly impact those who file a Statement of Premium Taxes and Fees, and Continuation Fee Statements.  The change to go paperless is in accordance with Idaho Code § 41-210(4), which specifies the ‘place and manner’ of the filing of these documents.  There is no additional cost for the state to establish an electronic filing system.

“We want a user-friendly system for carriers and our staff, while saving fees and tax dollars,” said Director Dean Cameron.  “Our old system was laborious and employees would spend months reconciling the tax form with the companies’ annual filings.”

The Department will use Premium Pro state-specific software produced by TriTech, a firm that works closely with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).  The tech company is highly regarded for keeping current with technology and industry standards.  Idaho insurers who do not subscribe to this software can visit TriTech’s website for access to filing forms at no cost.

In 2017, the Department began researching cost-effective and convenient E-file systems.  A survey of large insurance carriers that sell premiums in multiple states and from all lines of business was conducted.  Many companies provided the Department feedback on using and establishing an E-file program.   

 

Idaho

Misleading ‘ACA Compliant’ Insurance Plans: The Department of Insurance is warning consumers shopping for health insurance to be wary of telemarketers and websites promoting ‘discount health plans’ that allegedly meet requirements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Consumers are encouraged to visit the Department website or to call 208-334-4250 to verify the licensing of any individual, agency or company using robocalls or online advertisements to promote discounted plans claiming to be ACA compliant.

The Department strongly advises consumers seeking health coverage to utilize the state’s insurance exchange, Your Health Idaho, or call 855-944-3246 to speak with a Your Health Idaho representative.  Dean Cameron, director of the Idaho Department of Insurance, says telemarketers and websites can often be “misleading and cause confusion” for those looking to secure proper health coverage.  The DOI has received numerous complaints from consumers who say they were misled.

“I highly recommend consumers use the state’s insurance exchange, or work with a licensed, local agent, or someone they know and trust to carefully evaluate plan options,” said Director Cameron.

Consider the following when shopping for a legitimate health plan:

  Confirm whether the plan is ACA compliant.

  Ask for a copy of the plan’s limitations and exclusions – what is and is not covered.

  Clarify any limitations on pre-existing conditions.

  Determine if the plan considers your doctor or hospital in-network.

  Review the benefits of receiving out-of-network care.

  Examine the benefit maximums – often the total amount a plan will pay.

  Document the contact information of any individual trying to sell you a plan, especially those not based in Idaho.

 

Washington

Risk Mitigation Rule: The Washington Department of Insurance adopted the Risk mitigation rule (R2018-11) on December 3, 2018. The rule takes effect on January 3, 2018. The rule-making allows for risk mitigation and emergency response activities for property insurers of non-commercial properties.

For more information, including the adopted rule (CR-103) and the concise explanatory statement, please visit the rule's webpage: https://www.insurance.wa.gov/risk-mitigation-r-2018-11?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_name=&utm_source=govdelivery&utm_term=

 

Washington

Adjuster Licensing Special Education Criteria: The Washington Department of Insurance adopted the Adjuster licensing special education criteria rule (R 2018-14) on November 29, 2018. The rule takes effect on January 1, 2019. The rule will create new, and amend existing, sections of WAC 284-17-123 to clarify the special education condition found in RCW 48.17.380(3)(d) for an adjuster license candidate.

For more information, including the adopted rule (CR-103P) and the concise explanatory statement, please visit the rule's webpage: https://www.insurance.wa.gov/adjuster-licensing-special-education-criteria-r-2018-14?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_name=&utm_source=govdelivery&utm_term=

 

Washington

Charitable gift annuities: The Washington Department of Insurance adopted the Charitable gift annuities rule (R 2018-13) on November 28, 2018. The rule takes effect on December 30, 2018. The rule will update the accounting requirements for licensing in the State of Washington for charities offering charitable gift annuities to comport with these changes in accounting rules.

For more information, including the adopted rule (CR-103P) and the concise explanatory statement, please visit the rule's webpage: https://www.insurance.wa.gov/charitable-gift-annuities-r-2018-13?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_name=&utm_source=govdelivery&utm_term=

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  insurance content 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By Staff Reporter, Tuesday, December 4, 2018


California

Small Insurer Failing

California's insurance regulator took expedited legal action today to secure the assets of and take control of Merced Property & Casualty Company, in an effort to protect the company's policyholders, including those who suffered losses in the Camp Fire. The volume of claims associated with the catastrophic Camp Fire-the deadliest and most destructive fire in California history-has overwhelmed the small insurer to the point of insolvency.

"California law gives us the authority to take over insurance companies that face insolvency. Protecting Camp Fire policyholders who have already suffered through so much was my first consideration," said Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones. "We are moving aggressively to take the necessary legal action to take control of the company and to trigger the state law enabling the California Insurance Guarantee Association to immediately begin the process of evaluating losses and paying claims."

The department filed with the Merced County Superior Court an expedited request for an order enabling the takeover of the company. The California Insurance Department's Conservation and Liquidation Office, established by law to handle the liquidation of failing insurance companies, is managing the transfer of the company's claims handling to CIGA.

While current insurance policies remain in-force for 30 days, anyone insured with Merced Property & Casualty Company should seek coverage with another insurer immediately. Once the court issues the requested order, the Conservation and Liquidation Office will notify policyholders about where and how to file a claim with CIGA for insured losses or the return of any unearned premium on their policy.

Given the unprecedented scale of recent wildfires, Jones directed the department to conduct additional detailed reviews of every property insurer domiciled in California to make sure they are properly managing their exposures. The department has received no reports of other insurers in a similar situation.

Source link: California Department of Insurance

 

California

Earthquake Rate Reduction: Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones has approved a rate reduction for California Earthquake Authority (CEA) residential earthquake policyholders that will bring millions of dollars in premium savings for tens of thousands of homeowners and renters in California.

 

“The department’s Rate Regulation Branch staff reviewed CEA’s rate filing and determined that the proposed rates should be lowered,” said Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones. “Department staff worked with CEA staff to arrive at approved rates that will result in an estimated total premium savings of $16.3 million to California consumers over a three-year period. Once again, Californians have benefited from the insurance commissioner's rate regulation authority."

The initial proposal in CEA’s rate filing was for a 0.4 percent increase. However, following the department’s actuarial review and recommendations, CEA submitted an amended filing, requesting a rate reduction of 1.7 percent. The proposed effective date is July 1, 2019.

The rate reduction is for CEA’s residential earthquake policy that can cover your home up to a certain amount, personal items in your home, such as furniture, TVs, and computers, and temporary and extra costs to live somewhere else while your area is evacuated or your home is being repaired.

Since Commissioner Jones took office in 2011, the department has reviewed more than 54,000 rate filings and saved consumers and businesses over $3.4 billion through rate reductions. Whether a particular policyholder as a result of this rate filing approval receives a rate reduction and how much, depends on their individual policy and CEA territory.

To make a home more earthquake resistant, the department encourages California homeowners to consider retrofitting their home. A verified retrofit may also allow homeowners to receive additional discounts on their homeowners and earthquake insurance policies. The California Residential Mitigation Program (CRMP) was established in 2011 to help Californians strengthen their homes against damage from earthquakes. CRMP established Earthquake Brace + Bolt to offer up to $3,000 to help California homeowners retrofit their house to reduce potential damage from earthquakes.

 

Source link: California Department of Insurance

 

Idaho

Life Insurance Policy Locator

 The national life insurance policy locator service — https://doi.idaho.gov/consumer/LifeAnnuity/PolicySearch — provides consumers with valuable assistance to search for a policy or to file a life insurance claim. Launched by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) in 2016, the service has helped Idahoans the past two years locate 109 policies that have paid out nearly $1.3 million in death benefits.

The user-friendly locator provides free nationwide access and streamlines the process for searching for ‘lost’ life insurance policies or annuities.  Nationally, nearly 25,000 such policies have paid consumers $368 million in death benefits since the online service became available.  Idaho Insurance Director Dean Cameron says “it’s not uncommon” for a person to unknowingly be designated a beneficiary of a policy or for a policy to be misplaced.

“Securing life insurance coverage is an important action of personal responsibility and financial independence,” he said.  “Therefore, it is recommended that policyholders make their beneficiaries aware of any policy that names them as beneficiary.  When a policy is lost, consumers don’t always know how or where to begin a search for a lost policy.”

Idahoans can access the locator through the Department website to submit a secure and confidential request.  Participating insurers will work to match requests with available policyholder information.  Matches are reported to state insurance departments.  Insurers then make contact with beneficiaries or their authorized representatives.  Tips for beginning and conducting a lost policy search include:

  Obtaining personal information from death certificates, bank statements or cancelled checks.

  Contacting organizations, associations or groups that may offer members life insurance policies.

  Consulting with insurance agents who provided the deceased home or auto insurance coverage.

Idahoans who have questions are encouraged to contact the Idaho Department of Insurance at 208-334-4250.

 

Oregon

Democratic Party Leadership: Oregon House Democrats, fresh off election victories that saw the caucus’ majority expand to 38 members, has elected their new leadership team for the 2019 Legislative session. 

 

Rep. Tina Kotek has been nominated to serve an additional term as Speaker of the House, while Rep. Jennifer Williamson was re-elected to serve in her role as the House Majority Leader.

Oregon Senate Democrats elected the following state senators to leadership positions:

Senate President Designate: Peter Courtney, D-Salem

Senate President Pro Tempore Designate: Laurie Monnes Anderson, D-Gresham

Senate Majority Leader: Ginny Burdick, D-Portland

Senate Deputy Majority Leader: Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Beaverton

In the 2019 Session, Democrats will hold an 18-12 majority in the Senate

 

Washington

Kreidler Issues Fines: Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler issued fines in October totaling $103,950 against insurance companies, agents and brokers who violated state insurance regulations.

Insurance companies

Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington, Seattle; fined $30,000, order 18-0378

Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington Options, Seattle; fined $50,000, order 18-0379

The companies erroneously sent a letter intended for Medicare Advantage Plan members only to nearly 168,000 members of its commercial plans in February 2017. The letter caused the members to think their health coverage had changed and misstated the name of the insurer.

Everest Reinsurance Co., Wilmington, Del.; fined $1,000, order 18-0411

The company sold health plans in Washington state in 2017 that were marketed as having different benefits than those the insurance commissioner approved. The company is no longer selling the plans in Washington.

American Service Insurance Co., Schaumburg, Ill.; fined $18,000, order 18-0364

The insurance commissioner fined the company for overcharging 359 Washington consumers nearly $75,000, which it has since repaid with 8 percent interest.

Markel American Insurance Co., Glen Allen, Va.; fined $2,000, order 18-0353

The insurance commissioner’s market conduct unit found problems with the company’s pet insurance product, including:

  Missing documentation in underwriting files.

  Not listing the full premium for some policies.

  Company officers’ signatures were missing from some policies.

  Failing to provide the annual privacy notice to some policyholders.

 

Agents and brokers

American Eagle Underwriting Managers, Delray Beach, Fla.; fined $500, order 18-0415

American Eagle sells insurance and surplus lines policies. The agency sold one insurance policy in Washington state before it was licensed to do so.

The insurance commissioner disciplined the following insurance producers for failing to notify the agency of administrative actions against them:

  William Tanner, Poulsbo, Wash.; fined $250, order 18-0381

  Jack T. Jarrell, Woodinville, Wash.; fined $250, order 18-0382

  Allied National Inc., Overland Park, Kan.; fined $500, order 18-0358

  John M. Brown Insurance Agency, Inc., Chicago; fined $250, order 18-0387

  Julie A. Burton, King Hill, Idaho; license revoked, order 18-0392

  Calton & Associates, Inc., Tampa; fined $250, order 18-0386

  Jeremy Edward Carlson, Johnstown, Colo.; license revoked, order 18-0391

  Shanelle Francis, Hopkinsville, Ky.; fined $250, order 18-0337

  John W. Kaklis, Clearwater, Fla.; license revoked, order 18-0394

  Fabienne Lunie Nau, Lilburn, Ga.; fined $250, order 18-0309

  Khanh Nguyen, Westminster, Calif.; fined $250, order 18-0384

  Johnathan Perkins, Chicago; license revoked, order 18-0393

Other organizations

Washington Association of Health Underwriters, Seattle; fined $200, order 18-0412

The continuing education provider for insurance producers failed to keep attendance records that satisfied the requirements in state law.

 

Source link: Washington Department of Insurance

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  insurance content  insurance industry  western alliance news 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Around the PIA Western Alliance States

Posted By Staff Reporter, Monday, November 19, 2018

Around the Western Alliance States

 

Alaska

Work Comp Rates

 Workers’ compensation rates are falling in Alaska. On January 1st businesses will see an average 17.5% drop. That’s a 14.8% drop for voluntary loss costs.

Alaska Insurance Director Lori Wing-Heier said yes to the new rates based on the recommendation of the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI). The new rates for 2019 follow a 5.4% decrease in 2017.

Rates in the state have fallen by 25% since 2015.

Labor Commissioner Heidi Drygas said, “This would be the biggest year-to-year decrease in workers’ compensation rates in 40 years. The department worked tirelessly to reform the workers’ compensation system to increase efficiency and lower medical costs, both major factors in premiums.”

Governor Bill Walker agrees. “These proposed rate reductions are welcome news for Alaska businesses — lower workers’ compensation costs reduce the burden on the small businesses that strengthen our economy,” he said.

Source link: Business Insurance

 

Idaho

Notice of Company Applying to become an Idaho Certified Insurer

 As of November 8, 2018, Hannover Rück SE of Hannover, Germany (AA-1340125 and NAIC Company Code 10241) has applied to become a Certified Reinsurer in the State of Idaho.

For questions or concerns regarding this application, please contact Nathan Faragher with the Idaho Department of Insurance no later than December 9, 2018.  He can be reached at 208-334-4250, or by e-mail at:  nathan.faragher@doi.idaho.gov.   

Visit doi.idaho.gov for further information.

 

Wildlife & Roadways

An increased potential for vehicular accidents involving deer and elk on Idaho roadways occurs during fall when cooler weather encourages wildlife activity.  The Idaho Department of Insurance urges drivers to always drive with caution and to be on the lookout for animals on the roadway, most particularly during dawn and dusk when wildlife tends to be more active.

During this time, deer and elk naturally migrate to lower, warmer elevations, increasing their chances of crossing paths with a vehicle on the road.  Deer, elk and other wildlife tend to travel in herds, so if you see one, others may follow.  According to the National Highway Safety Administration (NHSA), about 1.5 million deer-related auto accidents happen nationwide each year, resulting in more than $1 billion in annual insured losses.

“Driving requires your full attention, most especially in rural areas or near migration routes where wildlife can make their way onto open roadways,” said Director Dean Cameron.  “It’s also important to review your auto policy and make sure you have proper coverage that can protect your loved ones and other drivers.”

‘Comprehensive’ coverage and not liability or collision is the portion of an automobile policy that Department officials say will pay for auto damages caused by wildlife.  Filing a claim for an accident covered by comprehensive coverage may still require paying a deductible before the insurer will cover the cost of the claim up to the policy limit.  Contact your insurance agent to discuss adding comprehensive coverage that will cover animal collisions.  Always be sure to take photos or video of any damage to support an insurance claim.

 

Oregon

Oregon Democratic Leadership

 Oregon House Democrats, fresh off election victories that saw the caucus’ majority expand to 38 members, has elected their new leadership team for the 2019 Legislative session.  Rep. Tina Kotek has been nominated to serve an additional term as Speaker of the House, while Rep. Jennifer Williamson was re-elected to serve in her role as the House Majority Leader.

Oregon Senate Democrats elected the following state senators to leadership positions:

Senate President Designate: Peter Courtney, D-Salem;

Senate President Pro Tempore Designate: Laurie Monnes Anderson, D-Gresham;

Senate Majority Leader: Ginny Burdick, D-Portland;

Senate Deputy Majority Leader: Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Beaverton;

In the 2019 Session, Democrats will hold an 18-12 majority in the Senate.

 

Workers’ compensation claims processing locations, reporting, recordkeeping; employer coverage requirements and effects of noncompliance

The Workers’ Compensation Division has published final rules to its website: https://wcd.oregon.gov/laws/Documents/New_rules/50-18061-posted-new.pdf.

 

The revised rules are in:

OAR 436-050, Employer/Insurer Coverage Responsibility; and

OAR 436-080, Noncomplying Employers.

These rules are substantially the same as when previously proposed. No public testimony was submitted regarding the proposed rules or presented at the hearing. A summary of the changes is included at the bottom of this message.

Please let me know if you have questions.

Fred Bruyns, policy analyst/rules coordinator

Department of Consumer and Business Services

Workers' Compensation Division

503-947-7717; fax 503-947-7514

Email: fred.h.bruyns@oregon.gov

Summary of changes in OAR 436-050:

Amended rule 0005 defines “claims processing location” as a place of business maintained or operated by an insurer, self-insured employer, self-insured employer group, or service company to process claims and keeps records as required by ORS 731.475 and 656.455. The rule excludes a post office box, commercial mail receiving agency, virtual office, or an employee’s place of residence from the definition.

Amended rule 0045 restores the definition of “adult foster home” removed from the rule by Administrative Order 16-054, effective 1/1/17.

Amended rule 0110 clarifies the requirements for in-state claims processing by insurers, and for registration of claims processing locations. The rule clarifies notification requirements for insurers that use service companies, and specifies what elements must be included in the agreement between the insurer and each service company. The rule also adds references to optional forms for use by insurers.

Amended rule 0120 includes minor clarifying wording changes regarding the requirements for maintenance, removal, and disposition of Oregon claim records.

Amended rule 0210 clarifies the requirements for in-state claims processing by self-insured employers, and for registration of claims processing locations. The rule clarifies notification requirements for self-insured employers that use service companies, and specifies what elements must be included in the agreement between the employer and each service company. The rule also adds references to optional forms for use by self-insured employers.

Amended rule 0220 includes minor clarifying wording changes regarding the requirements for maintenance, removal, and disposition of Oregon claim records, and replaces reference to “claim records” with “claims records.”

Summary of changes in OAR 436-080:

Repealed rule 0001 included a statement of the director’s authority for promulgating rules – removed because this authority is provided under ORS chapter 656, and it does not need to be stated in rule.

Repealed rule 0002 included a statement of purpose that has been moved, with wording changes, to rule 0003.

Amended rule 0003 includes a statement of purpose to replace the statement in repealed rule 0002, and the rule explains that the director may waive procedural rules as justice requires, unless otherwise obligated by statute.

Amended rule 0005 defines “noncomplying employer order,” and removes definitions of certain terms no longer used in these rules or that are defined in ORS chapter 656.

Repealed rule 0006 explained that orders issued by the division are considered to be orders of the director; however, all orders under these rules are orders of the director.

Amended rule 0010 describes the procedure for an employer to contest a noncomplying employer order and the consequence of not appealing the order within the time allowed.

Repealed rule 0020 explained the consequences if an employer does not appeal a noncomplying employer order within the time allowed, and this provision has been moved to rule 0010.

Repealed rule 0030 explained procedures for an employer to contest a noncomplying employer order, and this provision has been moved and reworded to rule 0010. The provisions of rule 0030 related to the agency’s participation in hearing are replaced with a reference to OAR 436-001-0030.

Amended rule 0040:

  Provides for the director’s discretion to impose civil penalties under ORS 656.735(2) in amounts less than $250 per day, consistent with statute

  Specifies methods that may be used for the calculation of premium amounts that would have been paid if the employer had obtained coverage, to include estimation of payroll when necessary, and application of assigned risk rates established by the National Council on Compensation Insurance

  Has clearer wording and is reorganized to enhance clarity

Amended rule 0060 has clearer wording and includes a statement that OAR 436-001-0030(2) to (5) apply to hearings regarding non-subjectivity determinations.

Amended rule 0065 has clearer wording regarding determination of an assigned claims agent.

Amended rule 0070 has clearer wording regarding reimbursement of the assigned claims agent.

Amended rule 0080 has clearer wording and removes a provision explaining which section within the Department of Consumer and Business services is responsible for collection of moneys owed by noncomplying employers.

Tags:  Around the PIA Western Alliance States  idaho insurance  oregon insurance 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 21
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  >   >>   >| 

A special thank you to our KKlub Members for their support.